Author: ram15006

Faculty Grants (VentureWell Opportunities)

Up to $30k grant opportunity to help students develop inventive, STEM-based ideas and gain entrepreneurial skills. RFP opening in August.

 

get funding and support to pioneer new ways to engage students in stem innovation and entrepreneurship and grow your campus i&e ecosystem

VentureWell is excited to announce new faculty grant opportunities for Spring 2017. We are seeking proposals for two new focus areas that will support the emerging generation of inventors and innovators and the i&e ecosystems critical to their success.

Our Faculty Grants help fund and support faculty with innovative ideas to create new or transform existing courses and programs to help students develop novel, STEM-based inventions and gain the necessary entrepreneurial skills needed to bring these ideas to market. The Spring cycle has three areas of focus:

Focus 1: Innovation and Invention Education for the First Year Student:
Many undergraduate students are not exposed to innovation and entrepreneurship until their final year in courses such as the capstone design. We can better prepare students for these culminating experiences and increase the pipeline of student inventors and innovators through early exposure to innovation and entrepreneurship education.

This focus offers a two-phase grant opportunity:

  • A $5,000 Phase 1 planning grant and workshop
  • Grantees from Phase 1 who have completed the workshop are invited to apply for the Phase 2 grant of up to $30,000 to develop and implement their plan

Focus 2: Faculty Fellowship for Student Venture Development:
Many university students have access to innovation and entrepreneurship programming on their campuses, but many do not gain support or funding beyond local ecosystems. Because of this, student teams often lack key knowledge that would make them desirable to national venture development programs.

VentureWell is seeking proposals from faculty who are interested in preparing student entrepreneurs to be competitive beyond their campus; improving their own skills for teaching invention and innovation to solve real-world problems, and exploring new ways to teach entrepreneurship concepts.

This focus offers funding, training, and support:

  • $10,000 in grant funding for curriculum development, course materials, and travel
  • Attendance at E-Team Stage 1 workshop and access to the curriculum

Focus 3: Pathways-Scale and Institutionalization: (open only to Pathways premium members)
Up to $30,000, to scale or institutionalize one or more components of your campus innovation and entrepreneurship ecosystem.

*For this Spring 2017 grant cycle we are accepting proposals only for these three focus areas. If you would like to submit a proposal on another topic, please submit to the Fall 2017 cycle (deadline November 8).

For complete details on each focus, click on the read the guidelines links on the right.
For questions please contact: grants@venturewell.org

 

Link to more information

E-Team Program (VentureWell Opportunity

Up to $25k grant opportunity for student teams. Applications dueOctober 4.

 

Venturewell helps student inventors make impacts on the world.

We fund and train student inventors and entrepreneurs who want to address important problems in the world through new technology-based ventures. Our E-Team Program provides funding, immersive workshops, and specialized coaching to student STEM innovators to help them move their inventions into the marketplace.

E-Team program. Grants and training to help university entrepreneurs move ideas out of the lab and into the marketplace. Stage 1, Market Discovery: 50 teams; Key objective: Discover the best market for the invention; $5,000 in funding. Stage 2, Business Model: 20 teams; Key objective: Develop and validate business model; $20,000 in funding. Aspire: Investment Readiness: 10 teams; Key objective: develop a case for partners and investors to invest in the business; Opportunity for further funding.What’s an E-Team?
An E-Team—or Entrepreneur-Team—is a multidisciplinary group of students and faculty working together to bring an invention to market. Here are some of our top E-Teams.

Eligibility
There are five questions to ask:

  1. Do you have a science or technology invention?
  2. Could your invention scale to address a social or environmental need? Some examples of types of technologies we fund include medical or healthcare-related
    devices, clean energy technologies, and technologies for low-resource settings.
  3. Does your team include two or more students (grad or undergrad)?
  4. Does your team have a faculty advisor?
  5. Is your university a VentureWell member? Check your school’s membership status.

If the answer to all of those questions is yes, then the E-Team Program is for you. Read the detailed guidelines.

 

Link to more information

Student Engineers Monitoring System for Bridges

Kevin McMullen, a structural engineering Ph.D. student at UConn, has designed a bridge-safety monitoring device.

 

In the middle of a June night in 1983, a 100-foot span of the Mianus River Bridge in Greenwich, Conn., collapsed, plunging two cars and two tractor-trailers into the river 70 feet below.

Three people died, three were seriously injured, and diverted I-95 traffic snarled local streets for six months. Inspections revealed that an undetected fatigue crack caused the catastrophic bridge failure.

Kevin McMullen, a structural engineering Ph.D. student at UConn, is too young to remember that tragedy. But he has designed a bridge-safety monitoring device that might have prevented it. He’s hoping his company, NexGen Infrastructure, can revolutionize transportation safety.

Using force-sensing pads that continuously monitor bridges, the system can warn engineers about a bridge that is overstressed. The pads can be installed on a new bridge or one that is being repaired. The system doesn’t replace human inspection, but can help establish priorities in a nation where one in 10 bridges is structurally deficient.

“Our hope is that if something is going drastically wrong with a bridge, engineers would be alerted that the bridge needs to be inspected right away,’’ he said. “We are anticipating that the federal government and state departments of transportation will feel it is a worthwhile investment.’’

McMullen recently received a $40,000 grant from the UConn School of Engineering in partnership with Connecticut Innovations. This award is given to engineering students with promising technologies, to help them enter the marketplace. Ironically, the award is called the Third Bridge Grant.

“Not much has changed in infrastructure over the last few decades,’’ McMullen said. “More recently, new technologies are being developed for infrastructure and civil engineering. This push towards innovation makes me know I’m in the right field.’’

McMullen, who earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from UConn in 2015, smiles when asked how he developed his passion.

“As a kid, I built with Legos and loved creating things,’’ he said. “When I decided what to study at UConn, civil engineering was the choice for me. And for some reason, I’ve just always loved bridges.’’

He is working on a Ph.D. thesis about a new, streamlined bridge-repair process that would be more cost-effective and minimize traffic disruptions.

“Many people surrounding me at UConn, including Professor Hadi Bozorgmanesh, who teaches an entrepreneurship program for graduate students, and my adviser, Professor Arash Zaghi, have really pushed innovation and got me thinking out of the box,’’ said McMullen.

“UConn has been very instrumental in getting my company off the ground. The Third Bridge grant I was awarded is helping me to start my company and bridge ‘the valley of death,’ so when I leave UConn, I can hit the ground running.’’

 

 

 

 

Claire Hall

Link to original article: http://today.uconn.edu/2017/05/engineering-student-devises-monitoring-system-bridges/